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Archive for June, 2007

his glory is the fullness of the whole earth - Christianic

Posted by Pelgrim on 27th June 2007

KJV Isa 6:3 And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, [is] the LORD of hosts: the whole earth [is] full of his glory.

Hebrew literal translation: his glory is the fullness of the whole earth

KJV Isa 6, 9 And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.
10 Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.

The difference between those inside and those standing outside

Mat 13 10 Why speakest thou unto them in parables? 11 He answered and said unto them, Because it is given unto you to know the mysteries of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it is not given.

12 For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath.

13 Therefore speak I to them in parables: because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not, neither do they understand. 14 And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of Esaias, which saith, By hearing ye shall hear, and shall not understand; and seeing ye shall see, and shall not perceive:

15 For this people’s heart is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes they have closed; lest at any time they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them.

16 But blessed are your eyes, for they see: and your ears, for they hear. 17 For verily I say unto you, That many prophets and righteous men have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard them. 18 Hear ye therefore the parable of the sower.

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his glory is the fullness of the whole earth - Judaic

Posted by Pelgrim on 26th June 2007

KJV Isa 6:3 And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, [is] the LORD of hosts: the whole earth [is] full of his glory.

Hebrew literal translation: his glory is the fullness of the whole earth

KJV Isa 6, 9 And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.
10 Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.

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Peace is the way

Posted by Pelgrim on 25th June 2007

Mahatma GhandiThere is no way to peace. Peace is the way. - Mahatma Ghandi

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Shema, hear Israel, The Lord our God is ONE Lord

Posted by Pelgrim on 25th June 2007

Deut. 6:4 Hear O Israel: The Lord our God is ONE (echaD), Lord.

The word shemA, hear and the word “echaD” are written in the Torah with enlarged letters on their ends. The word ED (Ayin Dalet) formed is the word WITNESS (see Joshua 22:27).
So, according to the Rabbis, the ED, (Ayin Dalet) stands as a Witness, or a Testimony in the “Shema” (Duet 6:4), to the Lord being ONE.

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Posted in Bible studies, Mysticism, Mysticism, Sufism, Tanakh study, Tawhid | No Comments »

Security compromise

Posted by admin on 25th June 2007

We were warned by our provider Siteground that their servers have been compromised by a newly found leak. They have taken the necessary steps to correct the issue.

However vistors of their hosted sites may have encountered malicious attempts to infiltrate their system by browsing an affected site.

We strongly suggest vistors to check their system for viruses, trojans and spyware and have a working and properly configured firewall in place. 

Links:

Online virus scan by Panda Software:
http://www.pandasoftware.com/products/ActiveScan.htm

Trojan info:
http://www.sophos.com/virusinfo/analyses/trojdwnldrgtu.html

Windows XP SP2 has a firewall feature. Make sure it is enabled and configured properly. However we recommend using a third party security product that will not only check incoming but also outgoing traffic.

A freeware firewall:
http://www.agnitum.com/products/

To check your firewall and system for open ports:
https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2

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The moral law argument by C.S. Lewis

Posted by Pelgrim on 14th June 2007

KJV Romans 2 14 For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves: 15 Which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another; [their conscience…: or, the conscience witnessing with them; the mean…: or, between themselves] 16 In the day when God shall judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ according to my gospel.

Many Christians claim moral superiority of having the truth on their side, judging and condeming others not having accepted their truth. But what does Paul teach? Gentiles doing by nature the things contained in the law, shewing the law written on their heart and their conscience bearing witness/judging them. How is that possible?

C.S. Lewis used the argument that the existence of universal moral values reasons for the existence of a universal moral Lawgiver. This argument of the existence of an universal accepted moral standard mirroring perfection maintains that the source of the objective moral values we experience must be an ultimately perfect Being.

C. S. LEWIS (1898-1963)

C. S. Lewis used an advanced form of the moral argument for God’s existence in his work Mere Christianity.1 Lewis argued that man’s idea of right and wrong is a clue to the meaning of the universe.2 Lewis reasoned that there must exist a universal moral law for several reasons. First, all moral disagreements between persons imply an appeal to a standard of behavior to which all persons are subject.3 People accused of doing wrong usually claim that their action did not violate the universal standard, or that they somehow had a special excuse for not submitting to the standard in this particular case.4 They do not usually deny the standard itself. Second, quarreling often occurs when one person tries to prove that the action of another person is wrong. However, the fact that two people quarrel about whether or not an action was moral implies that they agree that there is such a thing as right and wrong.5 One person claims the action was right; the other person claims the action was wrong. What they agree upon is the concept of right and wrong (the moral law).67 For instance, when confronted with imminent danger, a man may desire to run for safety but instead chooses to disregard his own well-being to rescue another. Therefore, the moral law is not man’s basic instincts. Instead, it judges between these instincts to determine which instinct is to be applied in the specific situation.8

For instance, when confronted with imminent danger, a man may desire to run for safety but instead chooses to disregard his own well-being to rescue another. Therefore, the moral law is not man’s basic instincts. Instead, it judges between these instincts to determine which instinct is to be applied in the specific situation.For instance, when confronted with imminent danger, a man may desire to run for safety but instead chooses to disregard his own well-being to rescue another. Therefore, the moral law is not man’s basic instincts. Instead, it judges between these instincts to determine which instinct is to be applied in the specific situation.For instance, when confronted with imminent danger, a man may desire to run for safety but instead chooses to disregard his own well-being to rescue another. Therefore, the moral law is not man’s basic instincts. Instead, it judges between these instincts to determine which instinct is to be applied in the specific situation.For instance, when confronted with imminent danger, a man may desire to run for safety but instead chooses to disregard his own well-being to rescue another. Therefore, the moral law is not man’s basic instincts. Instead, it judges between these instincts to determine which instinct is to be applied in the specific situation.Lewis also believed that it is wrong to say that this moral law is merely a social convention.9 For not everything that man has learned from others is a social convention. Some things, like mathematics, would be true even if it was never taught.10 The moral law is like mathematics in this respect. It is real regardless of what one’s society teaches about it.11 Social progress makes no sense unless the moral law exists independent of societies.12 If the moral law is merely invented by society, then one society (America) cannot call the actions of another society (Nazi Germany) wrong.13

Lewis declared that the moral law cannot be a law of nature.14 For a law of nature is descriptive. It describes how nature is, how it usually acts. But, the moral law does not describe how nature is. The moral law is prescriptive; it prescribes how nature ought to be.15 The moral law stands above man and judges his behavior.

Lewis concluded that there exists a moral law above all men to which they are subject.16 However, matter could not be the cause of moral laws.17 Matter gives instructions to no one. Experience shows us that mind is the cause of moral laws.18 Therefore, this universal moral law that stands above all men must come from a Mind that stands above all men.19

ENDNOTES

1 C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity, 15-39.C. S. Lewis, , 15-39

2 Ibid., 15.

3 Ibid., 17.

4 Ibid.

5 Ibid., 17-18.

6 Ibid.

7 Ibid., 22-23.

8 Ibid., 23.

9 Ibid., 24.

10 Ibid.

11 Ibid.

12 Ibid., 24-25.

13 Ibid., 25.

14 Ibid., 27-29.

15 Ibid., 28.

16 Ibid., 31.

17 Ibid., 34.

18 Ibid.

19 Ibid.

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Posted in Bible studies, Human consciousness, Humanism | No Comments »

the monogenes of the Father, become one, first

Posted by Pelgrim on 2nd June 2007

KJV John 1 14 And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the monogenes of the Father, full of grace and truth.

Mono is from the greek word mono, one, single and genes, to become.

In the aramaic peschitta it reads the word: Ekhadaya is a beautiful theological term employed by many Eastern theologians and poets. It literally means THE ONE

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Posted in Bible studies, Christian view of Isa, Mysticism, Sufism | 1 Comment »